Jul 15
The two study considerations that prospective students ignore at their peril
The clock is now ticking apace for this year’s matric class, who won’t only face the two most important exams of their lives so far when they head back to school, but who will also need to pin down their study options for next year without delay.

Although it is already quite late in the day, pupils are still encouraged not to rush the decision about what they want to study and where they want to do so, but to get down to the business of sifting with determination, armed with a list of their non-negotiable requirements for their future institution of higher learning, an education expert has advised.

“If you’ve been putting off the admittedly hard work of investigating all your options, going to campuses and asking the tough questions, speaking to current students and student advisors and so forth, this is our reminder to you that time is running out and that you need to sort out your study options in coming weeks,” said Dr Felicity Coughlan, director of the Independent Institute of Education.

“Don’t leave it until later in the year, because the stress and workload associated with preparing for exams will be taking up all your physical and mental energy down the line, and you don’t want to be in a situation where you have to settle for second best either in terms of institution or in terms of your degree programme because you put things off for too long,” she explained.

But now, more than ever before, prospective students need to scratch below the surface, because an individual’s choice about institution and programme is likely to have future consequences that may not yet be apparent.

In particular, pupils need to evaluate how an institution incorporates ethics and sustainability, as well as citizenship into their curricula.

“The world is changing and evolving, and across the globe there is a major movement towards demanding more than just technical proficiency in the workplace,” said Coughlan.

This is why progressive institutions are increasingly paying attention not just to the theoretical aspects of curricula, but also on developing the young people in their care holistically to be able to join society post-graduation as well-rounded individuals who are able to make a contribution beyond what they are able to bring in terms of subject expertise.

Coughlan stated that employers and companies are often reluctant to employ recent graduates without a proven track record, because their focus during studies was exclusively on academics and scoring well on assessments and exams, rather than also developing holistic skill sets which allow them to operate effectively in the workplace, through work-integrated learning.

“When speaking to career advisors at public universities and private institutions, you must therefore interrogate how much they understand about the challenges in today’s world of work, but also whether they have considered and responded to likely challenges of the future,” she continued.

It is not just about what people can do, but also about the values and so-called softer skills such as a commitment to lifelong learning and resilience they have internalised during their studies.

She added, “For an institution to claim that it goes above and beyond very necessary academic excellence, they also need to be able to tell you about their big picture vision.”

Coughlan says there are lots of messages about careers changing and people needing to prepare for jobs of the future, but that if an institution can prove that they understand and take macro issues seriously, it is likely they will be turning out well-equipped and well-rounded graduates.

“So yes, marketing materials are a great start to determine whether a higher education institution takes ethics, sustainability and citizenship seriously. But the proof is found beyond that – and it can only be established by measuring the promise of the marketing against what you see when you walk around on the campus and interview students, support staff and academics,” added Coughlan.

The decision about what to study and where is one of the most important choices you will ever make, and you need to ensure that you are absolutely comfortable in the knowledge that what you will be learning over the next three to four years will provide you with more than technical knowledge.

Preparing students to be resilient with an arsenal of skills that will future-proof their careers means that good institutions can and must impart skills beyond the curriculum, and matrics will do well to make a call on an institution’s ability to do so before committing in writing.


Jul 15
Creative Expression
By: Joan Coetzee, Principal of Pecanwood College Pre-Preparatory

So, what is creative expression?

Creative expression allows children to express their feelings and emotions. It allows them freedom to articulate and express their thoughts – to think critically. Creative expression can be many things – it can be painting, dancing, fantasy play, drama, singing, crafts, building with blocks and making music.

Creativity helps with mental growth by giving opportunities to try out new things: a different way of thinking, problem solving as well as discovering their talents and uniqueness.

Creativity is a way of thinking and expressing yourself – a skill we all need! Every child is capable of creativity and is imaginative, we just need to provide opportunities to nurture it and NOT restrain it!

It is very important to have creative spaces both indoors and outdoors to develop and allow for their freedom of expression.

Some ideas of how to nurture creative expression:

Art:

Provide various mediums and encourage children to explore while doing art. Talk about the process and their finished project – be supportive. Children can make art out of anything – scraps of paper, playdough, nature and even mud.

Music / Dance / Singing:

Music brings so much pleasure, as well as important skills – it develops memory, language and rhythm. Use musical instruments and let children experiment. Join in with your children and choreograph a fun/silly dance. Make your own instruments – rice in a plastic bottle, a drum from a tin, anything works, there are no rules just be creative!

Drama / Fantasy play:

Have areas with books, dress up clothes, pillows, blankets, big boxes, anything works – just be creative! Have a microphone, even a make shift one and a stage, children love performing.

Creative Play:

Play is the work of a child. Children must be able to play freely and express themselves freely to ensure a healthy development.

Children learn when they experience the world around them. They need to be actively involved in all they do. They need to see, hear, touch, feel, taste and do things. It is all about the experience.

Activities should be based on the children’s interests and always put your emphasis on the process and not the finished product.

One of the best things you can do for a pre-schooler is to let them be creative with no judgement.



Jul 15
7 WAYS THAT MODERN ADVERTISERS ARE CHANGING THE GAME
Posted by Dale Hes - Oxbridge Academy

According to Forbes, people in developed countries are exposed to up to 10 000 ads every day, and they only actually pay attention to a tiny percentage of these. This means that advertisers have to come up with increasingly innovative and eye-catching ways to grab the attention of consumers.

If you’re considering a career in advertising or marketing, then you’ll be entering a creative field filled with exciting challenges. Check out these 7 inventive methods that modern advertisers are using to change the competitive game of advertising.

1. LIVE STREAMING
Over the past decade, social media has been one of the biggest ever game-changers in the world of advertising. Most successful brands are continually taking advantage of new functions offered by these platforms. One of the newest of these is livestreaming. Companies are using livestreaming on Facebook and Periscope to stream everything from events, to tutorials and competitions. Livestreaming has become a great way to increase interaction with customers and to draw in bigger audiences.

2. CREATING STORIES ON SOCIAL MEDIA
Social media stories have changed the way in which advertisers can grab the attention of users. Many social media users often go online simply to scroll through their feeds, searching for content of interest. This even includes advertisements, if they are eye-catching enough. Companies have used the story function on Instagram and Facebook to keep viewers interested, taking them on a visual and interactive journey.

3. USING STREET ART
With so many billboards, posters and signs cluttering our cities, graffiti catches much more attention nowadays. Advertisers are harnessing this by creating clever street art to promote their brands. See the advertisement below for an example of how creative this form of advertising can be.



4. GETTING CONSUMERS TO REFER YOU
Advertisers have come up with some very effective ways of getting customers to refer their friends or family. Airbnb, for example, offers travel credits to users who refer their friends. Hundreds of other companies, from online shopping stores to brick and mortar shops, offer discounts if you refer friends. And who can resist a good discount? 

5. MAKING BILLBOARDS THAT TRULY STAND OUT
To best get the attention of passers-by, advertisers need to make their billboards stand out. And some of them are doing this, literally. 3D billboards are breaking the norms of a standard, flat billboard, and certainly grab a lot of attention! Check out the Peanuts Movie billboard below.



6. USING SPONSORED QUIZZES
How many times have you been using social media, when you come across a quiz or fun exercise that you simply can’t resist clicking on? “Find out what you would look like as the opposite sex”, or “How would you die in Game of Thrones?” are two popular examples of these that have popped up over the past few years. Advertisers are creating irresistible quizzes like these as a great way to promote their companies.

7. GETTING CONSUMERS TO PROMOTE ADVERTS
When a company creates an eye-catching story on social media, a creative street art piece or a clever billboard, viewers are more likely to share their joy at the advertisement with people they know. They may take photos which they share on social media, greatly extending the advert’s reach beyond the original viewer. Companies can therefore get plenty of free extra publicity.

Want to throw yourself into this ever-changing, exciting world? Check out the advertising and marketing management courses offered at Oxbridge Academy.



Jul 15
SA students are facing a mental health crisis
From dealing with the stress of exams to coping with the anxiety of building a successful future, students tend to have a lot on their plates. According to the South African Depression and Anxiety Group (SADAG), one in four university students are likely to be diagnosed with depression, and 20% of students admit to having had suicidal thoughts at some point in their tertiary studies.

With these alarming stats in mind, it’s clear that SA students are in dire need of support in dealing with stress and anxiety. Shevon Lurie, Managing Director at Vega (a brand of the Independent Institute of Education – The IIE) says that higher education institutions should place greater emphasis on mental health and wellness, adding that a full-time social worker or counsellor is a must on every campus. 

“Students carry incredibly heavy loads of stress and unrealistic expectation on their shoulders, especially during exam time. Those loads only get heavier as they progress through their studies and feelings of anxiety about their career and future start to creep in,” says Lurie. 

Lurie says that there is a dedicated Wellness Navigator on each of Vega’s four campuses, who is responsible for helping students with their psychological needs while they are completing their studies at Vega. Students can also book one-on-one wellness sessions, covering everything from time management skills to academic support.

“I think that the stress of living in such a digitally driven world needs to be countered by humanness,” says Leigh Haselau, Campus Wellness Navigator at Vega. “Our goal is to create a culture of acceptance and non-judgement on campus so that students and staff feel comfortable to seek out counselling and support.”

During peak stress periods, the school also runs workshops and wellness days aimed at interacting with students and making sure their time is balanced between studying, socialising and rest. Staff are also offered wellness support and counselling.

According to Haselau, “students benefit from being navigated by people who feel emotionally supported and who work in a healthy staff culture. In any organisation, when staff feel valued and supported, they are more motivated to look after the organisation’s customer base.”

Creating an environment that is conducive to learning is also key. Haselau adds that one of the aspects of studying at Vega that most appealed to people is the campus, particularly the ‘Big Slide’, a prominent feature on the Johannesburg campus, and the ‘chill areas’ like the outside rooftop deck on the Cape Town campus where students can go for fresh air and great views of the city. 

Engaging with the bigger issues

Students at Vega are no strangers to producing work that deals with important issues surrounding social awareness, and this type of work often forms part of the curriculum. For example, Marius Du Toit, a second year graphic design student at Vega, recently won an International Creative Conscience Award for a campaign project he submitted on mental health. 

His campaign features a series of posters, each dedicated to the experiences associated with specific mental disorders, ending with the tagline, ‘help defeat mental illness’. Not only did this gain international recognition for Du Toit and his work, but also shed light on an important subject. 




Two other students at Vega – Raphael Kuppasamy and Jenny Groenewald – also earned praise for their social awareness project, ‘Earn Your Stripes’, which won the Special Honours Best Digital Student Award at the Bookmarks 2019. The campaign, designed for Adidas, encourages millennials to volunteer by offering them discounts on Adidas apparel for volunteering at nearby sports and non-sports-based organisations. 

“In any higher education institution, the biggest priority should be helping students to find their purpose in the world. That, to me, entails building programmes and initiatives into the curriculum that encourage students to engage with the issues that face the world, so that they can one day become citizens who make a meaningful impact and bring positive change to their fields,” says Lurie. 

For more information on The IIE Vega and to learn about the #100reasons to study at Vega, visit www.vegaschool.com.


Jul 02
SENS Announcement

ADvTECH Limited

(Incorporated in the Republic of South Africa)

(Registration number 1990/001119/06)

Share code: ADH

ISIN: ZAE000031035

("the Company" or "ADvTECH")

 

APPOINTMENT OF ACTING COMPANY SECRETARY

Further to the announcement released on SENS on 17 January 2019 regarding the resignation of Ms DM Dickson as Company Secretary of ADvTECH with effect from 31 March 2019, shareholders are notified that in accordance with paragraph 3.59(a) of the JSE Limited Listings Requirements, the board of directors of the Company wish to advise that Mr Didier Oesch ("Mr Oesch") has been appointed as Acting Company Secretary of ADvTECH with effect from 28 June 2019.

 

Mr Oesch will act as acting Company Secretary for a limited period until a full time Company Secretary is appointed.

 

Shareholders will be advised once a permanent candidate has been appointed.

2 July 2019

Johannesburg

Sponsor: Bridge Capital Advisors Proprietary Limited


Jul 01
Who needs an MBA?

by HB Klopper: Director: Executive Education at IIE MSA.

An MBA is one of the most popular Master’s degree programmes, with the highest demand in the world. Despite this, many people do not know exactly what an MBA consists of and what purpose it serves. With this article I tried to clear up your doubts, if you continue to read the sections below.

The main purpose of an MBA degree is to teach students how to manage a company in every way, or in other words, to train qualified executives who have a global vision for business to find innovative solutions to problems. Earning a Master's in Business Administration (MBA) can help working professionals enhance their career opportunities, receive increased compensation and job promotions. An MBA is particularly relevant for those who wish to lead an organisation, to understand universal business challenges, to apply best practices and to solve complex problems in the private and public sector. With a master’s degree, your career path will take a different trajectory than without one; a trajectory that aims you towards being as successful and respected as possible in your career path.

By having a master’s degree at your disposal, so many opportunities will open up to you in your life, both professional and personal. MBA graduates take jobs with small, medium and large organisations and often become entrepreneurs by starting their own businesses. Since the degree is geared toward real-world professional outcomes, the degree is designed specifically for working adults who have been in the workforce for a number of years in management or leadership roles. This allows the opportunity to also learn from your peers and gain from their experiences as well as that of the lectures and guest speakers.

According to employers, MBA graduates are sought after for their ability to think critically and solve complex problems. It is also true that employers usually look favourably on the qualification because the format promotes knowledge and skills that are applicable to any organisation (regardless of the sector). The universal appeal stems from the MBA's focus on collective business principles like finance, marketing, operations, technology, accounting, business strategy, organisational behaviour, economics and entrepreneurship.

Although involving a broad spectrum of business-related topics at face value, the real value sits in the personal growth benefits being exposed leadership competencies, combined with analytical and critical thinking. Not all MBA degrees are created equal. The number of institutions or business schools offering a Master's degree in Business Administration is increasing, making the space quite crowded. When recruiting, companies are looking for out-of-the-box thinkers who can innovate and offer a perspective different from their own. Studying a MBA forces one to get out of your comfort zone. It is guaranteed that you will encounter the latest business trends, apply the newest management techniques, and keep challenging yourself.

As an MBA is a big step, requiring self-discipline, time and financial commitment, it is recommended that you carefully consider at which institution you enrol. Not only is the reputation of the institution of utmost importance, but also the involvement of well qualified and experienced facilitators, over and above a proven track record in industry. Aspects such technology supported teaching and learning, easy access to the full set of support services and a network of business professionals and alumni are also important. An MBA will help you acquire business practices needed to start a new business or help existing ones grow. Without a doubt it will instil you with an entrepreneurial mind-set. For those who decide that an MBA is not worth it for them, there are alternatives to consider.

The Master of International Business degree is a good point in case, specialising in international business and cross border trading. Other Master’s degrees in related fields are also good options for somebody looking to focus on economics, accounting, applied mathematics or water management for instance. Once you graduate an MBA, regardless of the location where you plan to build your career, your degree will increase your business credibility. The real advantage of an MBA, however, is its proven versatility. With an MBA, you can pursue many careers and advance faster to better-paid jobs.


Jun 28
Chef Ricardo Queiroz Flies The South African Flag High In Nantucket

After graduating with merit from Capsicum Culinary Studio last year, the 22-year old South African is living in Nantucket, Massachusetts, in the US and is working at the Club Car Restaurant - one of the best eateries on the island.

Queiroz grew up in Edenvale, Johannesburg where he attended Edenglen High School. With working parents, the young Queiroz would often take over duties in the kitchen preparing dinner for the family. 

"This is where my love for cooking began as I would help my mother out on days where she would come home really tired and I would cook for the family,'' he says. “The more I cooked the more I wanted to try new things and cook new dishes that I had never tried before."

After leaving high  school, Queiroz decided to enroll at Capsicum and further his knowledge about food and the culinary industry with hopes of pursuing a career in it. 

"I enrolled at the Capsicum Rosebank campus and studied for a Diploma in Cooking and Food Preparation, graduating with merit last year," he says. "The course was really awesome and I made a lot of friends who were also interested in food just as much as I was”

During his time at Capsicum he had loads of great opportunities to cook at fun events such as the Korean Food and Film Festival and the Robertsons Spice pop up kitchen in Melrose Arch as well as working with some celebrity chefs. The young graduate went on to do his industry placement at the Radisson Blu Hotel in Sandton, working at action stations, interacting with guests - both local and international -and also working the hot line in the sauté and grill positions.

After his industry placement Queiroz signed up with Workaway International for their summer programme and was offered a six month position at Aberdeen Golf & Country Club in Boynton Beach in Florida in the US.

"After my contract expired I applied for a job at the Club Car Restaurant in Nantucket and was lucky enough to get it”. It is one of the best restaurants on the island with executive chef Mayumi Hattori who is well known in the industry and has worked with many famous chefs such as Ken Oringer and Jamie Bissonnette.

Queiroz continues: "It has been another great experience so far. I'm cooking the best food I have to date in my short career and I am continuing to learn as much as I can”. Working at the restaurant as a hot line cook and manning the plancha (ie. griddle) and sauté stations is by no means easy work and Queiroz regularly works 11-hour shifts - from 12 noon through  to 11pm - six days a week.

"It's hard work but it is so worth it," he says. "But everyday I feel like I've accomplished something good."




Jun 28
Think hard before choosing a university
In the coming weeks, public universities and private institutions across South Africa will host a series of open days – events meant to showcase their offerings to prospective students from the matric class of 2019.

Education experts advise learners who intend to study next year to attend as many open days as possible to ensure they make the most informed study choice.

But more than just attending, learners need to approach the open days with a strategy and ensure they look beneath the surface and get a real understanding of what their experience a particular institution or campus is likely to be.

“This is a very exciting time for matrics who for the first time will be able to get some real-life insights about life on campus and what their future might be like in coming years after school,” said Wonga Ntshinga, senior head of programme of the ICT faculty at The Independent Institute of Education.

“We advise Grade 12s to determine without delay when various institutions will be hosting open days – an online search will suffice – and then make an effort to attend as many as possible.”

Ntshinga further explained that there are many benefits to attending an open day.

These benefits include:

1. Gaining greater clarity on each institution’s offerings.

2. A chance to visit different faculties at an institution.

3. A chance to speak to representatives of the institution who will be able to help you determine which qualification is a good fit for you – if you are still uncertain.

4. A chance to get a feeling of life on a specific campus.

5. A chance to weigh up the offerings – academic and otherwise – of different institutions.

“There is one thing that prospective students must remember when attending open days and that is to keep a level head and not get too starry-eyed,” Ntshinga said.

“Open days are the perfect opportunity to get first-hand experience of a campus and its students, staff and academics.

“But the first rule of open days is to remember that an open day might not be a clear representation of every other day.

“Universities put their best foot forward to impress and attract future students on these days, so you have to be savvy and ask the right questions.”

Ntshinga further advised prospective students to spend a good amount of time on a campus to have a good look around and listen to their gut feel while doing so.


Jun 26
Art is Fundamental
By Charlene Lang (Teacher at Maragon Ruimsig Pre-Primary)

What is art? Art is the “expression or application of human creative skill and imagination” thus may be brought through in a child in many forms: Music, Dance, Literature or Visual Creative Arts.

Art is a fundamental; this could almost be considered part of a vital milestone in the pre-school child’s learning. In my experiences with visual arts, the atelier is a place of research and experimentation where the child can express themselves through the stimulation of their own creativity. The experience is one of enjoyment and plays a role in shaping their own sense of personal, social and cultural identity. 

The art activities set out are of great importance as:

  • They help develop fine motor, gross motor and hand-eye co-ordination skills.
  • Problem solving abilities develop as they explore a huge variety of new materials and tools around them.
  • Art is one of the many languages of the world, discussions and conversations lead in different directions building on vocabulary and then where children of a limited vocabulary also have an outlet to express themselves.
  • The stages of art from scribbling to consciously drawing shapes, form a foundation for school readiness.
  • They teach children about cause and effect appealing to the child’s sense of curiosity.
  • Therefore, open–ended art is essential as it helps children not to be afraid of change and allows for a higher order thinking.
  • A sense of pride is developed, through the planning of an activity to the final outcome, it all has a purpose.
  • The child’s self-esteem develops through activities where they can express their own thinking through the freedom of choice. Independence is encouraged and taking responsibility for an activity boosts self-confidence.
  • Working in groups at times, spark collaboration, socialising and compromise, which are all life skills that are crucial for development.
  • Cultural identity and differences are built on through the introduction of various artists and their art works.
Art should no longer just take on the form of using only some or other mark-making tool onto paper. Art is the discovery of building, fitting, fixing, breaking and composing of loose parts, using old things to become new things. Thus, repurposing and upcycling. Our mind sets have been shifted from the traditional ridged and somewhat constricted views of what constitutes art or an artist. I think we as teachers are only scrapping the tip of the iceberg of the possibilities available worldwide. 

So, when teaching, we should then take on the opportunity to explore and expose our children to the wealth of resources available. Once we take on this ‘new age’ way of thinking we can then understand the full rich meaning of why art is so fundamental in learning, in the classroom and beyond.


Jun 26
THE TWO STUDY CONSIDERATIONS PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS IGNORE AT THEIR PERIL

The clock is now ticking apace for this year's Matric Class of 2019, who won't only face the two most important exams of their lives so far when they head back to school, but who will also need to pin down their study options for next year without delay.

Although it is already quite late in the day, learners are still encouraged not to rush the decision about what they want to study and where they want to do so, but to get down to the business of sifting with determination and armed with a list of their non-negotiable requirements for their future institution of higher learning, an education expert advises.

"If you've been putting off the admittedly hard work of investigating all your options, going to campuses and asking the tough questions, speaking to current students and student advisors and so forth, this is our reminder to you that time is running out and that you need to sort out your study options in coming weeks," says Dr Felicity Coughlan, Director of The Independent Institute of Education, SA's largest private higher education provider.

"Don't leave it until later in the year, because the stress and workload associated with preparing for exams will be taking up all your physical and mental energy down the line, and you don't want to be in a situation where you have to settle for second best either in terms of institution or in terms of your degree programme because you put things off for too long," she says.

But now, more than ever before, prospective students need to scratch below the surface, because an individual's choice about institution and programme is likely to have future consequences that may not yet be apparent.

In particular, learners need to evaluate how an institution incorporates ethics and sustainability, as well as citizenship into their curricula.

"The world is changing and evolving, and across the globe there is a major movement towards demanding more than just technical proficiency in the workplace," says Coughlan.

"This is why progressive institutions are increasingly paying attention not just to the theoretical aspects of curricula, but also on developing the young people in their care holistically to be able to join society post-graduation as well-rounded individuals who are able to make a contribution beyond what they are able to bring in terms of subject expertise."

Coughlan says employers and companies are often reluctant to employ recent graduates without a proven track record, because their focus during studies was exclusively on academics and scoring well on assessments and exams, rather than also developing holistic skill sets which allow them to operate effectively in the workplace, through work-integrated learning.

"When speaking to career advisors at public universities and private institutions, you must therefore interrogate how much they understand about the challenges in today's world of work, but also whether they have considered and responded to likely challenges of the future. In particular, and in your chosen field, have they considered how rapid technological advancement may impact on your ability to remain relevant into the future?

"It is not just about what people can do, but also about the values and so-called softer skills such as a commitment to lifelong learning and resilience they have internalised during their studies. For an institution to claim that it goes above and beyond very necessary academic excellence, they also need to be able to tell you about their big picture vision."

Coughlan says there are lots of messages about careers changing and people needing to prepare for jobs of the future, but that if an institution can prove that they understand and take macro issues seriously, it is likely they will be turning out well-equipped and well-rounded graduates.

"So yes, marketing materials are a great start to determine whether a higher education institution takes ethics, sustainability and citizenship seriously. But the proof is found beyond that – and it can only be established by measuring the promise of the marketing against what you see when you walk around on the campus and interview students, support staff and academics," says Coughlan.

"The decision about what to study and where is one of the most important choices you will ever make, and you need to ensure that you are absolutely comfortable in the knowledge that what you will be learning over the next three to four years will provide you with more than technical knowledge. Preparing students to be resilient with an arsenal of skills that will future-proof their careers means that good institutions can and must impart skills beyond the curriculum, and Matrics will do well to make a call on an institution's ability to do so before committing in writing."


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